Tag Archives: hula

Fine Arts Camper Requests

Last week I posted songbooks listing lyrics and chords for easy children’s songs, many of which we are playing in ukulele classes at Juneau Fine Arts Camp this month.  There have been some camper requests this past week, so I am posting links for them as promised.

Last summer, Trevor came to ukulele for all 4 weeks. When he returned this summer, he was still strumming the chords to Five Years Time by Noah and the Whale,  almost always at break-neck speed. It is a fun strumming pattern with a mute/beat in the middle that is very appealing to the older kids. Lyrics & chords are available at Ukulele Hunt. This song is a good one for practicing the transitions between C – F – G – F, and is a chord progression that works for other songs, like Twist & Shout, Labamba, Wild Thing, Louie, Louie,and Get Off of My Cloud. Only three chords and you practically have a busking set!

Owen, who is new this year to ukulele, asked me to look up the song Wonderwall, by Oasis. Happily,  the tabs provided on Ultimate Guitar had fairly easy chords (Am,C,G,D, and F), so we were able to give it a go with the 4th -6th graders. In looking up ukulele chords for the song, I happened upon this ukulele cover/tutorial posted by DerMoppelt on YouTube with a neat chord progression using variations on the G chord.

Elena performed and taught us all Speak Now, by Taylor Swift (tabs). A couple other easier pop songs for these guys are:  Little Talks by Of Monsters and Men (tabs);  Somebody That I Used to Know (official) by Gotye (tabs) or a fun ukulele team cover; and last summer’s favorite, Hey Soul Sister by Train (tabs).  These tab links are from ukutabs.com, a site with a helpful feature that allows you to transpose up or down by half steps until you find chords that you can play. Of course, the chords you can play are not always in a key you can sing, so choose your poison.

Finally, for Noah, E Huli Makou by David Chung.  This song is included in the 3-chord songbook, but since it is not a familiar one, I am giving a few more resources for those kids who want to keep working on it and parents who want to help them. Chords & lyrics (along with chord charts) are at Kanikapila.us , and  a translation and history of the lyrics (with a few different verses) can be found at Huapala.org. To hear the song and get a feel for the strumming pattern and Hawaiian pronunciation, watch it performed by Kealoha at 808ukejams (note: he  plays the G7 and C7 during “Ke Aloha”  instead of the NC – no chord – pause we have been playing in class.) The kids have all learned the hula to this song, too. You can see them in action on the Fine Arts Camp Facebook Page.

As always, everyone is welcome the Sunday ukulele jams at TK Maguire’s lounge, from 11-ish-1-ish.  Bring copies of songs you want to play, unless you would rather perform solos!

Playlist links from 2.24.13 Rockwell jam

This past Sunday we played many of the same as before, with the exception of a few Reid Tippet originals that are not yet in print. One song we played that I have not yet linked is below. Some day I’ll get everyone up doing the hula that goes with it!

E Huli Makou by David Chung                                                                                                                                                                                      

This is one of the first hulas I learned as a kid and is a good way to learn a few Hawaiian words and hula moves. Chords & lyrics are at Kanikapila.us. I learned to play this song with a G chord for the verses and a G7 for the vamp instead of the G7 throughout, but either works and both are easy. Translation and history of the lyrics can be found at Huapala.org. The site lists some additional verses not commonly sung and it does not include the “i hope” (pronounced ee-ho-pay) verse, which means “go back”. To catch the strumming pattern, you can play along with Kumu (teacher) Kealoha at 808ukejams, but if you want to see how to really dance this hula, watch Auntie Mokihana. One of my new goals is to be able to move like that by the time I’m her age!